Ever since my twin girls were born last summer, I’ve been making a more conscious effort to take time for myself, whether it be sweating out in the garden or cozying up on the couch with my knitting. One of the long-lost hobbies I’ve recently rediscovered is that of reading. There is nothing like getting lost in a good book. So even though it’s not necessarily “garden-related”, I had to tell you all about a novel I finished over the weekend which I’d place in the top 10 books I have ever read.

The book is “The Violets of March” by fairly new author, Sarah Jio. The majority of the novel takes place on Bainbridge Island in Washington where Emily, a young woman going through some less-than happy times in her life, visits her great aunt while longing to find peace and understanding. Even though I originally became interested in this novel as a result of the praise from one of my favorite authors, Jodi Picoult, I was even more interested when I read the title. After all, what novel with reference to a flower in its name could be bad? 😉 I quickly picked up a copy and could barely put it down once I started it. Three days later I turned the last page and breathed a sign of complete contentment.

Without giving much of the story away, there is a point in the book where some of its characters happen upon some wild violets. The discovery of these violets leads to a remembrance of a past life, a dear friend who no longer graces the characters’ lives. I personally found it interesting that the wild violets were the plants this new author chose since so many references to it on the internet are in regards to how to get rid of these little beauties. Personally, seeing them pop up in my lawn or garden areas has always put a smile on my face.

As fellow gardeners, I am confident that most if not all of my readers will be able to appreciate the significance the violets have in the book. It is another reminder about just how powerful a connection to a particular plant or bloom can be to a memory, a feeling, a place. So treat yourself to a new read and after you’ve spent a few minutes (or hours) laboring in your garden, come in and relax with a good book. I promise that you won’t be disappointed! And perhaps, there is a plant that sparks a memory in you which you could add to your garden this fall!

Until next time,